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What readers most commonly remember about John Stuart

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Director
Director
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Joined: 16 May 2014
Posts: 594
GRE 1: Q165 V161
Followers: 92

Kudos [?]: 439 [0], given: 64

What readers most commonly remember about John Stuart [#permalink] New post 22 Feb 2016, 05:03
Expert's post
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Question Stats:

36% (01:33) correct 63% (01:07) wrong based on 11 sessions
What readers most commonly remember about John Stuart Mill’s classic exploration of the liberty of thought and discussion concerns the danger of (i)__________: in the absence of challenge, one’s opinions, even when they are correct, grow weak and flabby. Yet Mill had another reason for encouraging the liberty of thought and discussion: the danger of partiality and incompleteness. Since one’s opinions, even under the best circumstances, tend to (ii)__________, and because opinions opposed to one’s own rarely turn out to be completely (iii)__________, it is crucial to supplement one’s opinions with alternative points of view.




Blank (i)Blank (ii)Blank (iii)
A. tendentiousnessD. embrace only a portion of the truthG. erroneous
B. complacencyE. change over timeH. antithetical
C. fractiousnessF. focus on matters close at handI. immutable



Practice Test Questions
Question: 11
Page: 323



[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
B D and G
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 16 May 2014
Posts: 594
GRE 1: Q165 V161
Followers: 92

Kudos [?]: 439 [1] , given: 64

Re: What readers most commonly remember about John Stuart [#permalink] New post 22 Feb 2016, 05:05
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Explanation


An overview of the passage suggests that the first sentence is relatively self-contained and that the blank is answerable without the succeeding sentences, where the topic shifts slightly. The colon after the first blank signals that what follows will define the word in the blank and will explain what danger Mill was concerned about. It says that without challenge, one’s opinions grow “weak and flabby” and therefore one becomes complacent, not tendentious or fractious. A quick reading of the next two sentences suggests that the topic will be another danger that Mill described, “the danger of partiality and incompleteness.” Free and open discussion needs to take place because each person’s opinion tends to “embrace only a portion of the truth” and others’ views are partially right, or never completely “erroneous.” The other choices for the second and third blanks deal with change, immediacy, or antithesis, none of which relate to the
second danger of “partiality” or “incompleteness.”
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Re: What readers most commonly remember about John Stuart   [#permalink] 22 Feb 2016, 05:05
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What readers most commonly remember about John Stuart

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