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The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t

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The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t [#permalink] New post 01 May 2018, 07:05
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The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability to separate one’s own taste from one’s intellectual evaluation of the work. It is easy for the unwary critic to find her judgment swayed by subjective factors such as her emotional response to a piece of art. This tendency must be strictly curbed so that the critic is able to judge the art with an unbiased eye. One of the best ways to build the foundation for this objective criticism is to obtain an education in the history of art, cultivating the ability to place a given work within a social and ideological context. Only once the critic has established this intellectual framework can she allow herself to react to the art on a visceral level, blending her subjective and objective responses into a unified critique.

According to the passage, which of the following is necessary to create a unified critique of a work of art?

A) The complete removal of one’s own taste from an intellectual evaluation of the work

B) An intellectual foundation in art history, as well as a visceral response to the work

C) An extended perusal of each relevant piece of art

D) The viewpoints of numerous well-educated critics who have also seen the work

E) The discipline to focus solely on the creative style of one artist
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t [#permalink] New post 05 May 2018, 00:06
can anyone provide the answer?
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Re: The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t [#permalink] New post 05 May 2018, 02:41
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If you attempt the question through the timer the correct answer will be spoil

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Re: The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t [#permalink] New post 27 Jun 2018, 08:17
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Re: The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t [#permalink] New post 28 Jun 2018, 09:05
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I'm actually not sure why the best answer would be 'A.' The question asks specifically for a 'unified critique,' not just an 'objective' critique. By its own definition, the passage asserts that a 'unified critique' is one that arises from the blending of 'subjective and objective.' The passage also defines an objective interpretation as one arising from an 'intellectual framework' and a subjective interpretation as one that arises from a 'visceral' reaction.

The'unified critique' thus requires an ability to separate one's own tastes (which, according to the passage, can come from a historical framework for the piece), and a subjective response (that the passage calls 'visceral'). Answer A, "The complete removal of one’s own taste from an intellectual evaluation of the work," calls for only the objective. Answer B, "An intellectual foundation in art history, as well as a visceral response to the work," calls for the foundation of an objective response and a subjective response.

Because the question specifically asks for a 'unified critique,' and not just an objective critique, I'm not sure why 'A' is a better answer than 'B.' Even though I believe both are necessary (as the question also asks), answer 'B' addresses both points whereas answer 'A' only refers to one. Am I missing something important?
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Re: The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2018, 01:29
Can i have the explanation of the answer....please?
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Re: The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t [#permalink] New post 02 Jul 2018, 15:58
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Joshalthoff wrote:
I'm actually not sure why the best answer would be 'A.' The question asks specifically for a 'unified critique,' not just an 'objective' critique. By its own definition, the passage asserts that a 'unified critique' is one that arises from the blending of 'subjective and objective.' The passage also defines an objective interpretation as one arising from an 'intellectual framework' and a subjective interpretation as one that arises from a 'visceral' reaction.

The'unified critique' thus requires an ability to separate one's own tastes (which, according to the passage, can come from a historical framework for the piece), and a subjective response (that the passage calls 'visceral'). Answer A, "The complete removal of one’s own taste from an intellectual evaluation of the work," calls for only the objective. Answer B, "An intellectual foundation in art history, as well as a visceral response to the work," calls for the foundation of an objective response and a subjective response.

Because the question specifically asks for a 'unified critique,' and not just an objective critique, I'm not sure why 'A' is a better answer than 'B.' Even though I believe both are necessary (as the question also asks), answer 'B' addresses both points whereas answer 'A' only refers to one. Am I missing something important?


I totally agree with your analysis.

I am not sure either why A is the OA and at the same time is better than B.

For me , reading the brief passage is more suitable.

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Re: The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t [#permalink] New post 03 Aug 2018, 05:57
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Carcass wrote:
Joshalthoff wrote:
I'm actually not sure why the best answer would be 'A.' The question asks specifically for a 'unified critique,' not just an 'objective' critique. By its own definition, the passage asserts that a 'unified critique' is one that arises from the blending of 'subjective and objective.' The passage also defines an objective interpretation as one arising from an 'intellectual framework' and a subjective interpretation as one that arises from a 'visceral' reaction.

The'unified critique' thus requires an ability to separate one's own tastes (which, according to the passage, can come from a historical framework for the piece), and a subjective response (that the passage calls 'visceral'). Answer A, "The complete removal of one’s own taste from an intellectual evaluation of the work," calls for only the objective. Answer B, "An intellectual foundation in art history, as well as a visceral response to the work," calls for the foundation of an objective response and a subjective response.

Because the question specifically asks for a 'unified critique,' and not just an objective critique, I'm not sure why 'A' is a better answer than 'B.' Even though I believe both are necessary (as the question also asks), answer 'B' addresses both points whereas answer 'A' only refers to one. Am I missing something important?


I totally agree with your analysis.

I am not sure either why A is the OA and at the same time is better than B.

For me , reading the brief passage is more suitable.

Regards


I applied the same thinking as well. Did you guys find out why the answer is A and not B?
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Re: The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t [#permalink] New post 03 Aug 2018, 06:05
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OE: The correct answer is A) The complete removal of one’s own taste from an intellectual evaluation of the work for the reasons stated above. The others can’t be correct because: there’s no mention of benefiting from a visceral response to the work; nothing about observing the art piece for a long period of time, nor needing other critics to tell one what to think about the art.

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Re: The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t [#permalink] New post 16 Sep 2018, 15:43
Joshalthoff wrote:
I'm actually not sure why the best answer would be 'A.' The question asks specifically for a 'unified critique,' not just an 'objective' critique. By its own definition, the passage asserts that a 'unified critique' is one that arises from the blending of 'subjective and objective.' The passage also defines an objective interpretation as one arising from an 'intellectual framework' and a subjective interpretation as one that arises from a 'visceral' reaction.

The'unified critique' thus requires an ability to separate one's own tastes (which, according to the passage, can come from a historical framework for the piece), and a subjective response (that the passage calls 'visceral'). Answer A, "The complete removal of one’s own taste from an intellectual evaluation of the work," calls for only the objective. Answer B, "An intellectual foundation in art history, as well as a visceral response to the work," calls for the foundation of an objective response and a subjective response.

Because the question specifically asks for a 'unified critique,' and not just an objective critique, I'm not sure why 'A' is a better answer than 'B.' Even though I believe both are necessary (as the question also asks), answer 'B' addresses both points whereas answer 'A' only refers to one. Am I missing something important?


I was also torn between A and B but when you relate the question back to the passage, the question ask which of these are necessary?. The key here is intellectual foundation is not necessary but rather a way to acheive a visceral response, as stated in the passage. So B is partly correct but A is stated in the first sentence of the passage.
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Re: The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t [#permalink] New post 25 Sep 2018, 14:30
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The key to this one is the word NECESSARY. I think most are able to remove C, D, and E from contention, its deciding between A and B that is difficult. This is where the word "necessary" becomes the deciding factor.
"The criticism of art REQUIRES ...the ability to seperate one’s own taste from one’s intellectual evaluation of the work."

On the other hand, when talking about a foundation in art history, it merely states that "one of the best ways to build." When talking about blending in the visceral, this is you blending in your own gut reaction to a piece, it would technically never be necessary for critiquing a piece. Regardless, the art history like of being absolutely necessary alone is enough to make the answer not be B.

While the short passage does infer that both a foundation in art history and using your own visceral response are important/useful for creating a unified critique, it DOES NOT say that they are necessary. Therefore, the answer must be A, because it is the only thing the passage explicitly states is NECESSARY for creating a unified critique of a work.

Anyway, this is certainly a very high difficulty question because if you just quickly read through it 2 answers seems about equally correct and the incorrect answer has the red herring of directly using the words "unified critique of a work of art." One of the first things you should do when reading a question on the GRE is determine if there are any specific modifying words such as "always" "necessary" "never" "sometimes" that could possibly change what the correct answer would be. This question, for example, specifically requires you to realize its using an absolute term and therefore can throw out any answer that isn't equally absolute. Thats how I went about it at least.
Re: The criticism of art requires, above all else, the ability t   [#permalink] 25 Sep 2018, 14:30
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