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Sentence Equivalence

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Intern
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Joined: 10 Mar 2019
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Sentence Equivalence [#permalink] New post 15 Mar 2019, 10:21
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Question Stats:

50% (00:05) correct 50% (00:24) wrong based on 2 sessions
For someone so unjustifiably (i) ______ success, the recently installed CEO perhaps surprised very few when his series of impractical business solutions did not (i) ______ the floundering firm.



Blank (i) Blank (ii)
assured of pan out for
intrigued by end disastrously for
unfamiliar with reflect negatively on









Have a lot of dilemma with the first blank.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by Carcass on 15 Mar 2019, 11:56, edited 1 time in total.
Edited by Carcass
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Re: Sentence Equivalence [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2019, 09:40
Expert's post
No one was surprised when the CEO failed. The first blank should relate to this idea.

"Intrigued by" means interested in. Being interested in, or curious about, success doesn't really make sense in general. Most people have a sense of what success is.

"Unfamiliar with" is the opposite of the meaning we want. If the CEO was unjustifiably unfamiliar with success, this means that he should be familiar with success. However, this is a terrible CEO whose ideas are impractical. So there's no reason why they should have been familiar with success.

That leaves choice A, "assured of," which fits. It's not perfect, but far better than the other choices. If the CEO was assured of success, then he thought he would succeed. This was totally unjustified, though, because this CEO is a terrible one who was never going to succeed.
Re: Sentence Equivalence   [#permalink] 21 Mar 2019, 09:40
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Sentence Equivalence

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