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Scholars of early Buddhist art agree that Buddha images in

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Scholars of early Buddhist art agree that Buddha images in [#permalink] New post 26 May 2017, 02:18
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Scholars of early Buddhist art agree that Buddha images in human form emerged around the first century a . d . in the regions of Mathura, located in central India, and Gandhara, now part of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Uncertainty exists, however, about whether Mathura or Gandhara has the stronger claim to primacy. Those who believe that anthropomorphic sculptures of the Buddha first appeared in Gandhara point out that earlier Buddhist art was largely aniconic and that bas relief was far more common than sculpture. They argue that Greek influence in Gandhara promoted the development of the new style and form of representation of the divine. Other scholars make the case for indigenous development of such representations in Mathura, citing a centuries-long record of iconic art in pre-Buddhist traditions. They do not reject all foreign influence, but they argue that local traditions provided a strong foundation for the development of Buddhist sculpture.

Art historians bolster their arguments by highlighting distinctive features of the sculptures from each region. For example, the artists of Gandhara sculpted their Buddhas in heavy, pleated drapery, similar to that of Greek statues. Wavy lines indicating hair also reflect Greek influence. Mathura Buddhas, on the other hand, are portrayed wearing lighter robes draped in a monastic style, often with part of the shoulder and chest left bare. Elongated earlobes and strong facial features characterize Mathura images of the Buddha, whereas Gandhara images possess more angular features. Sorting out dates and directions of influence has proven difficult, but the totality of evidence suggests that the Buddha image evolved simultaneously in both regions and was shaped by the predominant cultural influences in each region.
Which of the following, if true, would those who believe that anthropomorphic images of Buddha originated in Gandhara be likely to cite as evidence for their viewpoint?

A) Pre-Buddhist subcultures in the Gandhara region created representations of their deities in human form.
B) Mathuran Buddhas’ lightweight robes appear to have been modeled on the real robes of people who lived in a warm climate.
C) Gandharan artists were isolated from the larger society and not exposed to influences from outside the region.
D) Rulers from the Mathura region had political ties to Greek rulers and frequently exchanged gifts with them.
E) The hairstyles worn by Gandharan Buddhas are similar to those depicted on Greek pottery from the same period.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
E


According to the passage, Buddhist art

A) first appeared in regions that are now part of India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan
B) experienced a period during which human representations of the Buddha were not common
C) characteristically portrayed figures with elongated earlobes and strong facial features
D) began to appear in the medium of bas relief as a result of Greek influence
E) was more influenced by foreign artworks than by indigenous artistic traditions

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
B


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Re: Scholars of early Buddhist art agree that Buddha images in [#permalink] New post 01 Jul 2017, 07:10
They argue that Greek influence in Gandhara promoted the development of the new style and form of representation of the divine.

Is they actually believe that Greek influence in Gandhara promoted the development of the new style and form of representation of the divine.??
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Re: Scholars of early Buddhist art agree that Buddha images in [#permalink] New post 03 Jul 2017, 01:02
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There are several schools of thought.

Some scholars say that the greek influenced the statue in Gandhara others say that the result is due to the autochthonous. Conflict opinions
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Re: Scholars of early Buddhist art agree that Buddha images in   [#permalink] 03 Jul 2017, 01:02
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