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Saturn's E ring consists of particles so small that they wou

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Saturn's E ring consists of particles so small that they wou [#permalink] New post 27 Feb 2017, 15:07
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Saturn's E ring consists of particles so small that they would be dispersed by solar radiation pressure in a few tens of thousands of years. That the ring exists today suggests, therefore, that it originated in the relatively recent past—but how? Researchers suggest that Enceladus, one of Saturn's moons, may be responsible. This icy moon has no craters, possibly because liquid water from its interior flowed across the surface in the relatively recent past, erasing all preexisting impact features. An impact into Enceladus within the past thousand years or so may have blasted liquid water into space. Water droplets would have frozen quickly into ice crystals, which may then have drifted through the Saturnian system and formed into the E ring.
Consider each of the choices separately and select all that apply.

Which of the following, if true, would challenge the hypothesis presented in the passage concerning Enceladus and Saturn's E ring?
❑ Enceladus is not the only moon orbiting Saturn.
❑ Enceladus's lack of craters is not due to erasure by water.
❑ No impact has occurred on Enceladus in the past few tens of thousands of years.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
B and C


Select the sentence that points out the significance of the fact that the particles that make up Saturn's E ring are susceptible to dispersion.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
That the ring exists today suggests, therefore, that it originated in the relatively recent past—but how?


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Re: Saturn's E ring consists of particles so small that they wou [#permalink] New post 09 Mar 2017, 09:36
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Explanation

1) Actually the first question asks to weaken the argument. Saturn's E ring was the result of Enceladus action. Both B and C are in the passage, so are true. Challenge these two statements means weaken what are they saying. Indeed, pick the right answers.

2)
Quote:
Select the sentence that points out the significance of the fact that the particles that make up Saturn's E ring are susceptible to dispersion.


I.E. the statement says: how these particles went to create the ring ??

The second sentence is the answer
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Re: Saturn's E ring consists of particles so small that they wou [#permalink] New post 18 Jun 2017, 11:54
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Replying to a private message, for clarifications.

First off, this question comes from GRE Powerprep the most difficult and tricky ones.

Back to the question: as per stimulus we need to challenge what is stated in the passage, I.E to weaken the argument.

Which of the following, if true, would challenge the hypothesis presented in the passage concerning Enceladus and Saturn's E ring?

Enceladus is not the only moon orbiting Saturn

This is true and is stated clearly in the passage

Quote:
Researchers suggest that Enceladus, one of Saturn's moons, may be responsible


Enceladus's lack of craters is not due to erasure by water.

This is false
Quote:
This icy moon has no craters, possibly because liquid water from its interior flowed across the surface in the relatively recent past, erasing all preexisting impact features.


No impact has occurred on Enceladus in the past few tens of thousands of years.

This is false

Quote:
An impact into Enceladus within the past thousand years or so may have blasted liquid water into space. Water droplets would have frozen quickly into ice crystals, [u]which may then have drifted through the Saturnian system and formed into the E ring[/u].


Hope now is clear. The most important thing is to read veryyyyyyyyy carefully.

regards
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Re: Saturn's E ring consists of particles so small that they wou   [#permalink] 18 Jun 2017, 11:54
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