It is currently 09 Dec 2018, 23:27
My Tests

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Quantitative Comparison and Manipulation

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 16 May 2014
Posts: 594
GRE 1: Q165 V161
Followers: 92

Kudos [?]: 439 [0], given: 64

Quantitative Comparison and Manipulation [#permalink] New post 09 Aug 2014, 01:58
Expert's post
Many quantitative questions have variables in both columns. While your first instinct may be to work algebraically, this strategy is not always best. Often the fastest way to a solution is by plugging in different values to see which column is greater.

Developing a sense of when to plug in and when to solve algebraically takes practice. Here are a few helpful guidelines when trying to determine which approach to use.



Work algebraically if the question is a polynomial



If you are dealing with a polynomial, simplify. Plugging in may require too much calculation. Instead, work with the familiar algebraic forms shown below:
\((a - b)(a + b) = a^2 - b^2\)
\((a - b)(a - b) = a^2 - 2ab + b^2\)
\((a - b)^2 = a^2 - 2ab + b^2\)
\((a + b)^2 = a^2 + 2ab + b^2\)

Now let’s take a look at a question.
Attachment:
q1.png
q1.png [ 7.26 KiB | Viewed 1292 times ]


In Quantitative Comparison we can make it so each side is equal. Then we can balance the equation, adding and subtracting, multiplying and dividing, where necessary.
First, note that \(x^2 - 4\) can be factored into (x - 2)(x + 2). Now we can set both columns equal to each other:

(x - 2)(x - 2) = (x - 2)(x + 2)

At this point we have to be careful. While algebra tells us to divide both sides by (x – 2), we need to be aware of the following: if x is between 0 and 2, (x-2) yields a negative. However, (x + 2) yields a positive, meaning (x – 2)(x + 2) gives us a negative. In this case (A) would be bigger.

However, if we divide each side by (x – 2) and solve we get the following:
DIVIDE EACH SIDE BY (x – 2)

x - 2 = x + 2

SUBTRACT ‘X’ FROM BOTH SIDES

0 = 4

This hardly looks like a solution (in fact it looks like I forgot to go to grade school!). However, what this yields is the important insight: Column B is now 4 greater than Column A. Therefore, the answer is (D). Alternatively you could pick numbers, such as ’0′ and ’4′. Each gives us different answers, leading to the same conclusion: Answer (D)

If the question has variables, but there no polynomials, plug in values.



This advice pertains to variables that are not in polynomial form, as seen above. Here come up with easy numbers to plug in to see which values the columns yield.

0 > x > y > z > -1
Attachment:
q2.png
q2.png [ 9.92 KiB | Viewed 1292 times ]

It would be very nice if we could just stop here and choose answer (B). However, things are not so simple. When plugging in one set of numbers we will inevitably come up with one outcome. Once we’ve plugged in and come up with one answer, whether it is (A), (B), or (C), our job is to disprove that answer.
Can we make Column A larger than Column B? Well what if we plug in a values for x and y that are very close to one another. \({-1/10}/ {-1/9} = 9/10.\) Now, for z we can plug in a value close to -1, say -8/9. This gives us \({-1/9}/{-8/9} = 1/8\). Now you can see (B) is much smaller. Therefore the answer is (D).

Takeaway



You should be adept at both algebra and plugging-in to efficiently—and accurately—answer a quantitative comparison question that contains variables. Typically it is best to simply check for polynomials before plugging in.
_________________

My GRE Resources
Free GRE resources | GRE Prep Club Quant Tests
If you find this post helpful, please press the kudos button to let me know ! :)

Manager
Manager
Joined: 03 Dec 2017
Posts: 65
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 15 [0], given: 20

Re: Quantitative Comparison and Manipulation [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2018, 19:50
the first question got me very confused. can we plug it number to make it easier?
Manager
Manager
Joined: 03 Dec 2017
Posts: 65
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 15 [0], given: 20

Re: Quantitative Comparison and Manipulation [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2018, 19:51
why (x - 2)(x - 2) = (x - 2)(x + 2);
can anyone explain this part
Re: Quantitative Comparison and Manipulation   [#permalink] 16 Jan 2018, 19:51
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Quantitative Comparison and Manipulation

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GRE Prep Club Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GRE Prep Club Rules| Contact

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group

Kindly note that the GRE® test is a registered trademark of the Educational Testing Service®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by ETS®.