It is currently 12 Dec 2018, 16:30
My Tests

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

QOTD #20 Invisible theater and guerrilla theater are two for

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 5153
Followers: 77

Kudos [?]: 1031 [0], given: 4643

CAT Tests
QOTD #20 Invisible theater and guerrilla theater are two for [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2016, 01:17
Expert's post
00:00

Question Stats:

66% (07:28) correct 33% (08:09) wrong based on 9 sessions
Invisible theater and guerrilla theater are two forms of street theater with similar origins but very different approaches. Both forms take place exclusively in public places, but invisible theater conceals its performative nature whereas guerrilla theater flaunts it. While invisible theater creates a performance space unbeknownst to its audience, guerrilla theater actively seeks the attention of an audience by explicitly imposing a performance space onto a public place.

Starting in the early 1970’s, Augusto Boal and fellow actors have staged scenes regarding social issues in public or semi-public places (e.g., restaurants), crafting their dialog and action to get a verbal reaction from bystanders. Because performers and non-performers remain distinct, invisible theater returns somewhat to the model set up by traditional theater. However, there are a few key differences. The performance space is created in public places without the awareness of non-performers.For non-performers, being beyond the performative space allows them to avoid the etiquette of theatergoing and removes that “lens” that unavoidably emerges when we feel we are viewing art or performance. If people do not suspect that they are viewing art, however, they are free to engage with the action and concepts of an unfolding drama as if these actions and concepts were real.

Boal has documented various successful instances of invisible theater in which non-performers actively listen, participate in public-spirited discussion, and even take unplanned public-minded action in response to the dialogue and events set up by invisible theater performers. Because onlookers think they are witnessing real life events, because the performers are bold in their statements, because the scripted characters are very vocal about what they are doing and experiencing, invisible theater is able to instigate political conversation within an everyday context; it successfully creates public forums out of thin air.

Guerrilla theater creates surprise performances in public, but is driven by the forceful imposition of “traditional” (if we can call anything about guerrilla theater “traditional”) theater. One example includes two professors of Galway’s University College who dressed in their robes and went out to the street, questioning pedestrians and awarding diplomas to the ones least able to provide good answers, as a way to protest their university’s decision to grant Ronald Reagan an honorary doctorate in law.

A large part of the goal of guerrilla theater is to get publicized, its message echoed over and over in our ever-expanding network of technology interface mass media. Guerrilla theater knows it may antagonize its direct audience—it often hopes to, because conflict is more likely to be broadcast, and the goal of guerrilla theater is to get people talking publicly.
Consider each of the answer choices separately and indicate all that apply.

Which of the following can be inferred from the passage?

  • When people are unaware that they are viewing a performance, they tend to act more naturally.
  • Invisible theater is best described as improvisational.
  • One measure of the success of a theatrical performance can be the actions taken by the audience oncethe performance is over.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
I and III only


The main point of the passage could best be described as

(A) a discussion of two different but aligned artistic currents
(B) an examination of which of two art forms is more effective at prompting political action
(C) a synopsis of the evolution of theater
(D) a presentation of two theatrical concepts that conceal their performative nature
(E) an overview of artistic life in public places

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
A


Consider each of the answer choices separately and indicate all that apply.

Which of the following is true of both invisible theater and guerrilla theater?

  • both have a goal of encouraging discourse
  • both impose performance space onto public location
  • both antagonize their audience

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
I and II only


The passage implies that the Galway professors believed which of the following?

(A) Guerrilla theater was superior to invisible theater.
(B) Protesting an honor could result in the revocation of the award.
(C) Granting Ronald Reagan a degree demeaned the intellectual standard of the university.
(D) Handing out diplomas was a legal activity.
(E) Ronald Reagan’s foreign policy had deleterious effects.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
C


Consider each of the answer choices separately and indicate all that apply.

Which of the following, if true, would undermine the principle of invisible theater?

  • When people knowingly view art, their heightened attention increases their perception and involvement.
  • Audience members watch a performance and later report to others what happened, still not knowing that the event was a theater piece.
  • A lively debate about public issues is brought to a halt by the imposition of scripted characters inserting theatrical dialogue.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
I and III only


_________________

Get the 2 FREE GREPrepclub Tests

1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
Joined: 09 Mar 2016
Posts: 33
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 15 [1] , given: 11

Re: QOTD #20 Invisible theater and guerrilla theater are two for [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2016, 00:15
1
This post received
KUDOS
can you please explain the part of the passage that we can infer the third inference in Q#1?
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
Joined: 23 Jan 2016
Posts: 137
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 109 [1] , given: 15

Re: QOTD #20 Invisible theater and guerrilla theater are two for [#permalink] New post 30 Jul 2016, 05:20
1
This post received
KUDOS
Tapi wrote:
can you please explain the part of the passage that we can infer the third inference in Q#1?


"invisible theater is able to instigate political conversation within an everyday context; it successfully creates public forums out of thin air."suggest that success of a theatrical performance can be the actions taken by the audience, hence Choice iii is correct.
1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
Joined: 05 Sep 2018
Posts: 2
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 2 [1] , given: 0

Re: QOTD #20 Invisible theater and guerrilla theater are two for [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2018, 11:26
1
This post received
KUDOS
Tapi wrote:
can you please explain the part of the passage that we can infer the third inference in Q#1?


Passage 3rd paragraph wrote:
"A large part of the goal of guerrilla theater is to get publicized, its message echoed over and over in our ever-expanding network of technology interface mass media. Guerrilla theater knows it may antagonize its direct audience—it often hopes to, because conflict is more likely to be broadcast, and the goal of guerrilla theater is to get people talking publicly."


The last paragraph says the goal is to broadcast to other people.
We can infer/assume that the performance is successful if the goal is met.
Guerrilla theater antagonizes its direct audience, and in turn the audience broadcast to the public.

Therefore, the success of its goal can only be measured once the performance is over and broadcasted to the public.
Re: QOTD #20 Invisible theater and guerrilla theater are two for   [#permalink] 05 Sep 2018, 11:26
Display posts from previous: Sort by

QOTD #20 Invisible theater and guerrilla theater are two for

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GRE Prep Club Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GRE Prep Club Rules| Contact

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group

Kindly note that the GRE® test is a registered trademark of the Educational Testing Service®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by ETS®.