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Picture-taking is a technique both for annexing the objectiv

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Picture-taking is a technique both for annexing the objectiv [#permalink] New post 07 Jan 2019, 11:04
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66% (07:39) correct 33% (11:43) wrong based on 6 sessions
Picture-taking is a technique both for annexing the objective world and for expressing the singular self. Photographs depict objective realities that already exist, though only the camera can disclose them. And they depict an individual photographer’s temperament, discovering itself through the camera’s cropping of reality. That is, photography has two antithetical ideals: in the first, photography is about the world, and the photographer is a mere observer who counts for little; but in the second, photography is the instrument of intrepid, questing subjectivity and the photographer is all. These conflicting ideals arise from a fundamental uneasiness on the part of both photographers and viewers of photographs toward the aggressive component in “taking” a picture. Accordingly, the ideal of a photographer as observer is attractive because it implicitly denies that picture-taking is an aggressive act. The issue, of course, is not so clear-cut. What photographers do cannot be characterized as simply predatory or as simply, and essentially, benevolent. As a consequence, one ideal of picture-taking or the other is always being rediscovered and championed.

An important result of the coexistence of these two ideals is a recurrent ambivalence toward photography’s means. Whatever the claims that photography might make to be a form of personal expression on a par with painting, its originality is inextricably linked to the powers of a machine. The steady growth of these powers has made possible the extraordinary informativeness and imaginative formal beauty of many photographs, like Harold Edgerton’s high-speed photographs of a bullet hitting its target or of the swirls and eddies of a tennis stroke. But as cameras become more sophisticated, more automated, some photographers are tempted to disarm themselves or to suggest that they are not really armed, preferring to submit themselves to the limits imposed by premodern camera technology because a cruder, less high-powered machine is thought to give more interesting or emotive results, to leave more room for creative accident. For example, it has been virtually a point of honor for many photographers, including Walker Evans and Cartier-Bresson, to refuse to use modern equipment. These photographers have come to doubt the value of the camera as an instrument of “fast seeing.” Cartier-Bresson, in fact, claims that the modern camera may see too fast.

This ambivalence toward photographic means determines trends in taste. The cult of the future (of faster and faster seeing) alternates over time with the wish to return to a purer past — when images had a handmade quality. This nostalgia for some pristine state of the photographic enterprise is currently widespread and underlies the present-day enthusiasm for daguerreotypes and the work of forgotten nineteenth-century provincial photographers. Photographers and viewers of photographs, it seems, need periodically to resist their own knowingness.
According to the passage, the two antithetical ideals of photography differ primarily in the

(A) value that each places on the beauty of the finished product
(B) emphasis that each places on the emotional impact of the finished product
(C) degree of technical knowledge that each requires of the photographer
(D) extent of the power that each requires of the photographer’s equipment
(E) way in which each defines the role of the photographer

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
E



According to the passage, interest among photographers in each of photography's two ideals can best be described as

(A) rapidly changing
(B) cyclically recurring
(C) steadily growing
(D) unimportant to the viewers of photographs
(E) unrelated to changes in technology

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
B


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Re: Picture-taking is a technique both for annexing the objectiv [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2019, 22:54

+1 kudos to the posts containing answer explanations of all questions

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Re: Picture-taking is a technique both for annexing the objectiv [#permalink] New post 15 Jan 2019, 00:20
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As the Difficulty Level suggests Medium , Questions are easy to tackle .

Q1 asks as to how two antithetical ideals of photography differ , Para 1 has direct reference / Implication for the same ".....These conflicting ideals arise from a fundamental uneasiness on the part of both photographers and viewers of photographs toward the aggressive component in “taking” a picture....." So there is some disconnect as to how the Photographer is perceived by both sets of the people so Option E is the answer. Option A & B are rejected straight away as there is no mention or talk about the End product or the nature of the Final photograph. Reject Option C & D as any talk or mention about the nature of devices (Cameras) technical aspect arose only because of these TWO DIFFERING Ideas , not that they caused these Two Differing Ideas.

Q2. Last Paragraph has direct reference "...The cult of the future (of faster and faster seeing) alternates over time with the wish to return to a purer past..." & " ..., need periodically to resist their own knowingness..." So Option B is the answer.
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Re: Picture-taking is a technique both for annexing the objectiv [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2019, 07:53
Can somebody please explain for the question 2: Why not E?
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Re: Picture-taking is a technique both for annexing the objectiv [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2019, 11:37
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Quote:
An important result of the coexistence of these two ideals is a recurrent ambivalence toward photography’s means.


Quote:
But as cameras become more sophisticated, more automated, some photographers are tempted to disarm themselves or to suggest that they are not really armed, preferring to submit themselves to the limits imposed by premodern camera technology because a cruder, less high-powered machine is thought to give more interesting or emotive results, to leave more room for creative accident.


From the first [quote] od the passage you can see why B is the answer.

From the second quote you clearly know that it IS RELATED to the advance of technology.

Hope now is clear.

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Re: Picture-taking is a technique both for annexing the objectiv   [#permalink] 22 Mar 2019, 11:37
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