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Philosophy, unlike most other subjects, does not try

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Philosophy, unlike most other subjects, does not try [#permalink] New post 08 Feb 2016, 15:26
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Question Stats:

32% (00:27) correct 67% (00:49) wrong based on 28 sessions
Philosophy, unlike most other subjects, does not try to extend our knowledge by discovering new information about the world. Instead it tries to deepen our understanding through (i)_________ what is already closest to us — the experiences, thoughts, concepts, and activities that make up our lives but that ordinarily escape our notice precisely because they are so familiar. Philosophy begins by finding (ii)_________ the things that are (iii) _________.





Blank (i)Blank (ii)Blank (iii)
A. attainment ofD. essentially irrelevantG. most prosaic
B. rumination onE. utterly mysteriousH. somewhat hackneyed
C. detachment fromF. thoroughly commonplaceI. refreshingly novel



Practice Questions
Question: 6
Page: 69
Difficulty: hard


[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
B, E, G
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Last edited by Carcass on 30 Nov 2017, 00:04, edited 1 time in total.
Edited by Carcass
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Re: Philosophy, unlike most other subjects, does not try [#permalink] New post 08 Feb 2016, 15:28
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Explanation



The first two sentences present a contrast between extending our knowledge by discovering “new information about the world” — which we are told philosophy does not do — and extending knowledge through some activity involving “things that are closest to us.” The first blank asks us to identify that activity, and although “attainment” makes little sense in context, both “rumination on” and “detachment from” have some appeal.

However, the clear implication that philosophy attends to things that ordinarily escape our notice eliminates “detachment from” as a correct answer. Blank (ii) requires something that suggests the importance of familiar things as subjects of philosophical rumination, and “utterly mysterious” does just that. “Essentially irrelevant” and “thoroughly commonplace” do not fit logically since they suggest that these “familiar” things are unimportant.

Similarly, Blank (iii) needs to be consistent with the description of those things as familiar and close. “Most prosaic” fits that idea while “refreshingly novel” goes in the other direction. “Somewhat hackneyed” has some plausibility but is too negative given the overall tone of the sentence; there is no indication that those things are in any way trite.

Thus the correct answer is rumination on (Choice B), utterly mysterious (ChoiceE), and most prosaic (Choice G).
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Re: Philosophy, unlike most other subjects, does not try [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2017, 19:00
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sandy wrote:

Explanation



The first two sentences present a contrast between extending our knowledge by discovering “new information about the world” — which we are told philosophy does not do — and extending knowledge through some activity involving “things that are closest to us.” The first blank asks us to identify that activity, and although “attainment” makes little sense in context, both “rumination on” and “detachment from” have some appeal.

However, the clear implication that philosophy attends to things that ordinarily escape our notice eliminates “detachment from” as a correct answer. Blank (ii) requires something that suggests the importance of familiar things as subjects of philosophical rumination, and “utterly mysterious” does just that. “Essentially irrelevant” and “thoroughly commonplace” do not fit logically since they suggest that these “familiar” things are unimportant.

Similarly, Blank (iii) needs to be consistent with the description of those things as familiar and close. “Most prosaic” fits that idea while “refreshingly novel” goes in the other direction. “Somewhat hackneyed” has some plausibility but is too negative given the overall tone of the sentence; there is no indication that those things are in any way trite.

Thus the correct answer is rumination on (Choice B), utterly mysterious (ChoiceE), and most prosaic (Choice G).



I think the correct answer choices are not reflected in the solution key
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Re: Philosophy, unlike most other subjects, does not try [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2017, 23:58
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Sorry. This is an official question from the main Official Guide. Moreover, I have already check it out and the answer choices are correct.

here is the OE just for the sake

Quote:
Explanation

The first two sentences present a contrast between extending our knowledge by discovering “new information about the world” — which we are told philosophy does not do — and extending knowledge through some activity involving “things that are closest to us.” The first blank asks us to identify that activity, and although “attainment” makes little sense in context, both “rumination on” and “detachment from” have some appeal.
However, the clear implication that philosophy attends to things that ordinarily escape our notice eliminates “detachment from” as a correct answer. Blank (ii) requires something that suggests the importance of familiar things as subjects of philosophical rumination, and “utterly mysterious” does just that. “Essentially irrelevant” and “thoroughly commonplace” do not fit logically since they suggest that these “familiar” things are unimportant. Similarly, Blank (iii) needs to be consistent with the description of those things as familiar and close. “Most prosaic” fits that idea while “refreshingly novel” goes in the other direction. “Somewhat hackneyed” has some plausibility but is too negative given the overall tone of the sentence; there is no indication that those things are in any way trite. Thus the correct answer is the rumination on (Choice B), utterly mysterious (Choice E), and most prosaic (Choice G).


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Re: Philosophy, unlike most other subjects, does not try [#permalink] New post 07 Dec 2017, 22:54
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1. The part of the sentence that is related to blank (i) is this:
it tries to deepen our understanding through (i)_________

2. Only “rumination on” is related to deepening of understanding

3. The part of the sentence related to blank (ii) and blank (iii) is this:
“Rumination on” what is already closest to us — the experiences, thoughts, concepts, and activities that make up our lives but that ordinarily escape our notice precisely because they are so familiar.

4. One is finding in “utterly mysterious” the things that are “thoroughly commonplace”.

5. Answer: B,E,G
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Re: Philosophy, unlike most other subjects, does not try   [#permalink] 07 Dec 2017, 22:54
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