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Many critics of Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights see i

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Many critics of Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights see i [#permalink] New post 11 Feb 2016, 08:26
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Many critics of Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights see its second part as a counter-point that comments on, if it does not reverse, the first part, where a romantic reading receives more confirmation. Seeing the two parts as a whole is encouraged by the novel’s sophisticated structure, revealed in its complex use of narrators and time shifts. Granted that the presence of these elements need not argue for an authorial awareness of novelistic construction comparable to that of Henry James, their presence does encourage attempts to unify the novel’s heterogeneous parts. However, any interpretation that seeks to unify all of the novel’s diverse elements is bound to be somewhat unconvincing. This is not because such an interpretation necessarily stiffens into a thesis (although rigidity in any interpretation of this or of any novel is always a danger),but because Wuthering Heights has recalcitrant elements of undeniable power that, ultimately, resist inclusion in an all-encompassing interpretation. In this respect, Wuthering Heights shares a feature of Hamlet.
5. According to the passage, which of the following is a true statement about the
first and second parts of Wuthering Heights?

A The second part has received more attention from critics.
B The second part has little relation to the first part.
C The second part annuls the force of the first part.
D The second part provides less substantiation for a romantic reading.
E The second part is better because it is more realistic.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
D


6. Which of the following inferences about Henry James’s awareness of novelistic construction is best supported by the passage?

A James, more than any other novelist, was aware of the difficulties of novelistic construction.
B James was very aware of the details of novelistic construction.
C James’s awareness of novelistic construction derived from his reading of Brontë.
D James’s awareness of novelistic construction has led most commentators to see unity in his individual novels.
E James’s awareness of novelistic construction precluded him from violating the unity of his novels.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
B


7. The author of the passage would be most likely to agree that an interpretation of a novel should

A not try to unite heterogeneous elements in the novel
B not be inflexible in its treatment of the elements in the novel
C not argue that the complex use of narrators or of time shifts indicates a sophisticated structure
D concentrate on those recalcitrant elements of the novel that are outside the novel’s main structure
E primarily consider those elements of novelistic construction of which the author of the novel was aware

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
B


8. The author of the passage suggests which of the following about Hamlet?

A Hamlet has usually attracted critical interpretations that tend to stiffen into theses.
B Hamlet has elements that are not amenable to an all-encompassing critical interpretation.
C Hamlet is less open to an all-encompassing critical interpretation than is Wuthering Heights.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
B





Practice Questions
Question: 5-8
Page: 73-74
Difficulty: hard

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Re: Many critics of Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights see i [#permalink] New post 11 Feb 2016, 08:40
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Explanation



5.

According to the first sentence, the first part of the novel tends to confirm the “romantic” reading more strongly than the second. Therefore, Choice D is correct.

6.

The third sentence implies that James represents a very high degree of authorial awareness of novelistic construction and that no such claim is necessarily being made for Brontë. Thus, Choice B is the correct answer.

7.

Choice A may seem attractive because in the passage the author says that Wuthering Heights has heterogeneous elements that resist inclusion in a unifying interpretive scheme. Choice A is incorrect, however, because the author does not indicate that the unification of different elements is to be avoided in interpretation generally. By contrast, the author’s parenthetical statement about rigidity does present a general warning against inflexibility of interpretation, and it is this that supports Choice B as the correct answer.

8.

Hamlet is mentioned only in the final sentence of the passage, which refers to “this respect” in which Hamlet and Wuthering Heights are similar. The previous sentence reveals the point of similarity referred to: Wuthering Heights has elements that resist inclusion in an all-encompassing interpretive framework. Choice B is correct
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Re: Many critics of Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights see i [#permalink] New post 23 Apr 2019, 15:56
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Re: Many critics of Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights see i [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2019, 12:37
why not the ans c of Q 6?
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Re: Many critics of Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights see i [#permalink] New post 18 May 2019, 03:13
Thanks for posting.
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Re: Many critics of Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights see i [#permalink] New post 19 May 2019, 11:00
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priyanka67 wrote:
why not the ans c of Q 6?


When asked about specific objects in Reading Comprehension focus on that topic. In this case the sentence stating, "Granted that the presence of these elements need not argue for an authorial awareness of novelistic construction comparable to that of Henry James, their presence does encourage attempts to unify the novel’s heterogeneous parts."

In many instances, the correct choice to a targeted RC question is the one stating the least, especially when pertaining to inference. First predict what the answer should do, and in this case we can only infer that Henry James has a "comparable authorial awareness of novelistic construction".

So, then work through the choices looking for reasons to eliminate rather than select.

A. James, more than any other novelist, was aware of the difficulties of novelistic construction. | Eliminate for being extreme and unsupported

B. James was very aware of the details of novelistic construction. | Select as matching the prediction that James was an authority on novelistic construction

C. James’s awareness of novelistic construction derived from his reading of Brontë | Eliminate as James is an authority for Brontë, not based on her works

D. James’s awareness of novelistic construction has led most commentators to see unity in his individual novels. | Eliminate for being extreme and unsupported

E. James’s awareness of novelistic construction precluded him from violating the unity of his novels. | Eliminate as there is no mention of James' novels
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Re: Many critics of Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights see i   [#permalink] 19 May 2019, 11:00
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