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Jeffrey C. Goldfarb suggests public-spirited dialogue need n

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Jeffrey C. Goldfarb suggests public-spirited dialogue need n [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2017, 14:16
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Jeffrey C. Goldfarb suggests public-spirited dialogue need not happen after a traditional theater show, as it is most successful when it happens during a show. He believes that the live component of the theater distinguishes it from other media objects, and allows meaning to arise from the interaction between performers and audience as the performance is happening. Whereas television or film, for instance, has no room for active dialogue, theater does because the performers and audience are present in the space together. The theatrical text becomes the medium, and the performers speak through the way in which they perform the text, while the audience does so through a number of culturally sanctioned actions: applause, laughter (both laughing with and laughing at), sighing, gasping, cheering, and booing. Goldfarb recounts a particular occurrence surrounding a production of Dziady (Forefather’s Eve) in Poland in 1968. The show had been ordered to close and, on its last night, the theater was overcrowded with supporters. They were an enthusiastic, vocal audience who entered into“dialogue” with the actors and read into the play’s anti-czarist language a critique of Soviet government. When the performance ended, the crowd went into the streets to protest. The play’s content became political through dialogue and, in a way, the theater building held a public sphere where an anti-Soviet audience gathered to affirm their political sentiment before taking it to the street in open, public protest.

What Goldfarb does not write about is how uncommon such an event is, especially for today’s American theatergoers. Augusto Boal was probably closer to the reality of current Western theater when he complained about how still everyone is expected to keep during any performance, constantly policed by other audience members. The high prices on professional theater tickets and an elitist value on cultural tradition (versus popular, technology-based mass media) combine to produce an aristocratic culture surrounding theater. In this manner, a “high class” code of etiquette is imposed upon the performance space, dictating that audience members are to remain quiet: the actors speak, the audience listens. As Boal criticizes in Legislative Theatre, traditional form sets up a relationship where “everything travels from stage to auditorium, everything is transported, transferred in that direction—emotions, ideas, morality!—and nothing goes the other way.” He argues that this relationship encourages passivity and thus cancels theater’s political potential.
The primary purpose of the passage is to

(A) Lay out a viewpoint and present a perceived omission
(B) Articulate an original thesis
(C) Deride an established tradition
(D) Contrast two opposing ideas
(E) Reconcile two opposing ideas

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
A


Consider each of the answer choices separately and indicate \(all\) that apply.

The author implies which of the following about American theater?

❑ In some social settings, passivity is considered a virtue.
❑ Augusto Boal would approve of the events of the closing performance of Dziady.
❑ Physical presence has a bearing on the creation of active dialogue.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
I,II,II


Consider each of the answer choices separately and indicate \(all\) that apply.

Which of the following must be true according to the passage?

❑ By contemporary American social mores, the Polish audience described would be exhibiting other than “high class” behavior.
❑ Dziady criticized the Soviet regime.
❑ Theater is more educational than film.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
I only


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Re: Jeffrey C. Goldfarb suggests public-spirited dialogue need n [#permalink] New post 14 Apr 2018, 19:49
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can someone please explain the 2nd and 3rd question?
thank you
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Re: Jeffrey C. Goldfarb suggests public-spirited dialogue need n [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2018, 16:08
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The author implies which of the following about American theater?

❑ In some social settings, passivity is considered a virtue.

Quote:
In this manner, a “high class” code of etiquette is imposed upon the performance space, dictating that audience members are to remain quiet: the actors speak, the audience listens.




❑ Augusto Boal would approve of the events of the closing performance of Dziady.

In the last sentence of the passage, Boal asserts just this.
Quote:
He argues that this relationship encourages passivity and thus cancels theater’s political potential.
. The bold part means that political potential is excluded from theaters performance. I.E the theater is not the arena for political debate. So, this is positive


❑ Physical presence has a bearing on the creation of active dialogue.

Quote:
Whereas television or film, for instance, has no room for active dialogue, theater does because the performers and audience are present in the space together.


Which of the following must be true according to the passage?

❑ By contemporary American social mores, the Polish audience described would be exhibiting other than “high class” behavior.
❑ Dziady criticized the Soviet regime.
❑ The theater is more educational than film.

The interaction between the Polish audience and the cast and this sentence
Quote:
a “high class” code of etiquette is imposed upon the performance space, dictating that audience members are to remain quiet
make only the first statement true. The others are not mentioned.

Ask if something is still unclear to you. Tough passage.

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Re: Jeffrey C. Goldfarb suggests public-spirited dialogue need n [#permalink] New post 01 May 2018, 00:44
The play used an anti czarist language critique of soviet government...doesn’t this make the 2nd option true as well
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Re: Jeffrey C. Goldfarb suggests public-spirited dialogue need n [#permalink] New post 01 May 2018, 23:57
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The author implies which of the following about American theater?

❑ In some social settings, passivity is considered a virtue.
It is clearly mentioned in the second paragraph that american society considers passive behavior as polite.
"In this manner, a “high class” code of etiquette is imposed upon the performance space, dictating that audience members are to remain quiet: the actors speak, the audience listens."

❑ Augusto Boal would approve of the events of the closing performance of Dziady.
According to last sentence of the passage Boal criticized passivity and encouraged dialogue between actors and audience, hence he would have approved of the events of the closing performance of Dziady
❑ Physical presence has a bearing on the creation of active dialogue.
“Whereas television or film, for instance, have no room for active
dialogue, theater does because the performers and audience are present in the space together.”


Which of the following must be true according to the passage?

❑ By contemporary American social mores, the Polish audience described would be exhibiting other than “high class” behavior.
True because American society considered passivity as "high class" behavior.

❑ Dziady criticized the Soviet regime.
Not true, because the play itself didnt criticized the soviet regime... but the audience interpreted it to be critical hence only on the last day of the show, it became political because of the dialogues between audience and actors.
Notice the language-"read into the play’s anti-czarist language a critique of Soviet government."
read into means they interpreted it as anti-czarist.
❑ Theater is more educational than film.
It is irrelevant there is no mention of theater being educational.
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Re: Jeffrey C. Goldfarb suggests public-spirited dialogue need n [#permalink] New post 05 May 2018, 00:02
What about the first question?
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Re: Jeffrey C. Goldfarb suggests public-spirited dialogue need n [#permalink] New post 05 May 2018, 02:41
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What is your doubt regarding the first question ??
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Re: Jeffrey C. Goldfarb suggests public-spirited dialogue need n   [#permalink] 05 May 2018, 02:41
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