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Is the literary critic like the poet

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Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 25 Oct 2019, 09:40
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44% (09:24) correct 55% (09:12) wrong based on 36 sessions
[This passage was excerpted from an article published in 1975.]


Is the literary critic like the poet, responding creatively, intuitively, subjectively to the written word as the poet responds to human experience? Or is the critic more like a scientist, following a series of demonstrable, verifiable steps, using an objective method of analysis?

For the woman who is a practitioner of feminist literary criticism, the subjectivity versus objectivity, or critic-as-artist-or-scientist, debate has special significance; for her, the question is not only academic, but political as well, and her definition will court special risks whichever side of the issue it favors. If she defines feminist criticism as objective and scientific-a valid, verifiable, intellectual method that anyone, whether man or woman, can perform -the definition not only precludes the critic-as-artist approach, but may also impede accomplishment of the utilitarian political objectives of those who seek to change the academic establishment and its thinking, especially about sex roles. If she defines feminist criticism as creative and intuitive, privileged as art, then her work becomes vulnerable to the prejudices of stereotypic ideas about the ways in which women think, and will be dismissed by much of the academic establishment. Because of these prejudices, women who use an intuitive approach in their criticism may find themselves charged with inability to be analytical, to be objective, or to think critically. Whereas men may be free to claim the role of critic-as-artist, women-run different professional risks when they choose intuition and private experience as critical method and defense.

These questions are political in the sense that the debate over them will inevitably be less an exploration of abstract matters in a spirit of disinterested inquiry than an academic power struggle in which the careers and professional fortunes of many women scholars only now entering the academic profession in substantial numbers-will be at stake, and with them the chances for a distinctive contribution to humanistic understanding, a contribution that might be an important influence against sexism in our society. As long as the academic establishment continues to regard objective analysis as "masculine" and an intuitive approach as "feminine," the theoretician must steer a delicate philosophical course between the two. If she wishes to construct a theory of feminist criticism, she would be well advised to place it within the framework of a general theory of the critical process that is neither purely objective nor purely intuitive. Her theory is then more likely to be compared and contrasted with other theories of criticism with some degree of dispassionate distance.
17. Which of the following titles best summarizes the content of the passage?

(A) How Theories of Literary Criticism Cart Best Be Used
(B) Problems Confronting Women Who Are Feminist Literary Critics
(C) A Historical Overview of Feminist Literary Criticism
(D) A New Theory of Literary Criticism
(E) Literary Criticism: Art or Science?

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
B


18. It can be inferred that the author believes which of the following about women who are literary critics?

I. They can make a unique contribution to society.
II. They must develop. a new theory of the critical process.
III. Their criticisms of literature should be entirely objective.

(A) I only
(B) II only
(C) I and III only
(D) II and III only
(E) I, II, and III

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
A



19. The author specifically mentions all of the following as difficulties that particularly affect women who are theoreticians of feminist literary criticism EXCEPT the

(A) tendency of a predominantly male academic establishment to form preconceptions about women
(B) limitations that are imposed when criticism is defined as objective and scientific
(C) likelihood that the work of a woman theoretician who claims the privilege of art will be viewed with prejudice by some academics
(D) inescapability of power struggles between women in the academic profession and the academic establishment
(E) tendency of members of the academic establishment to treat all forms of feminist literary theory with hostility

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
E


20. According to the author, the debate mentioned in the passage has special significance for the woman who is a theoretician of feminist literary criticism for which of the following reasons?

(A) There are large numbers of capable women , working within the academic establishment.
(B) There are a few powerful feminist critics who have been recognized by the academic establishment.
(C) Like other critics, most women who are literary critics define criticism as either scientific or artistic.
(D) Women who are literary critics face professional risks different from those faced by men who are literary critics.
(E) Women who are literary critics are more likely to participate in the debate than are men who are literary crictics.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
D


21. Which of the following is presented by the author in support of the suggestion that there is stereotypic thinking among members of the academic establishment?

(A) A distinctively feminist contribution to humanistic understanding could work against the influence of sexism among members of the academic establishment.
(B) Women who define criticism as artistic may be seen by the academic establishment as being incapable of critical thinking.
(C) The debate over the role of the literary 'critic is often seen as a political one.
(D) Women scholars are only now entering academia in substantial numbers.
(E) The woman who is a critic is forced to construct a theory of literary criticism.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
B


22. Which of the following is most likely to be one of, the "utilitarian political objectives" mentioned by the author ?

(A) To forge a new theory of literary criticism
(B) To pursue truth in a disinterested manner
(C) To demonstrate that women are interested in literary criticism that can be viewed either subjectively or objectively
(D) To convince the academic establishment to revise the ways in which it assesses women scholars' professional qualities
(E) To dissuade women who are literary critics from taking a subjective approach to literary criticism

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
D


23. It can be inferred that the author would define as "political" questions that


(A) are contested largely through contentions over power
(B) are primarily academic in nature and open to abstract analysis
(C) are not in themselves important
(D) cannot be resolved without extensive debate
(E) will be debated by both men and women

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
A


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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 21 Feb 2020, 23:15
All correct, except q19. Can someone explain q19? I was wavering between A D E, selected A. Please explain why A wrong. I chose A because it said "tendency of a predominantly male academic establishment to form preconceptions about women," in the passage it does not seem like the author mentioned anything about the establishment was being predominantly MALE.
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 22 Feb 2020, 03:58
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This is a rough one. Really.

However, I came across by chance of this passage for the first time, i.e. I NEVER read it and I just posted for the students. First time I see it and to help you I had been starting to read it, of course.

However, the except questions are tricky and if you do not read very carefully the passage as a whole, you lose the grasp and could be daunting to reply.

BUT, having the master of the English Language in the upper-level range, this would permit you to reply to the question WITHOUT reading the passage.

Focus on the stem, understanding it and with your logic, you CAN answer the question without reading the passage. This is probably a unique example I saw in a long time


19. The author specifically mentions all of the following as difficulties that particularly affect women who are theoreticians of feminist literary criticism EXCEPT the

Now, the stem says, and by the way, the wording is difficult, that the feminists are attacked when they sustain something to their advantage. I.E. they endorse or explain something but they struggle to juxtapose their arguments



(A) tendency of a predominantly male academic establishment to form preconceptions about women

This is a difficulty they have. the scholars have assumptions about the women and their argument. Must be in the passage. It is a difficulty.

(B) limitations that are imposed when criticism is defined as objective and scientific

we do have the word: limitations. This is a compression of the women's arguments. Correct

(C) likelihood that the work of a woman theoretician who claims the privilege of art will be viewed with prejudice by some academics

Prejudice. It is a limitation with which the women have to struggle. Correct

(D) inescapability of power struggles between women in the academic profession and the academic establishment

The first word means that their struggle, have limitations, or what the women cope with has constraints in academia. Therefore, they are dragging down. They face stonewalls. Correct


(E) tendency of members of the academic establishment to treat all forms of feminist literary theory with hostility

The stems assert "specific mentions" but here we do have ALL forms. It must be not mentioned in the passage even if I did not read it. Not a words or a line. Wrong options. But because we are looking for an EXCEPT question, that is not mentioned, it is the right answer.

E is correct.


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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 25 Feb 2020, 20:48
mind wrote:
All correct, except q19. Can someone explain q19? I was wavering between A D E, selected A. Please explain why A wrong. I chose A because it said "tendency of a predominantly male academic establishment to form preconceptions about women," in the passage it does not seem like the author mentioned anything about the establishment was being predominantly MALE.


Agree with your point that there is no explicit mention of "predominantly male academic establishment" however you can infer it from:
a. presence of an academic establishment, which keeps giving reviews & criticisms that are prejudiced in nature
b. many places you will find mentions of sexism, theoreticians of feminist literary criticism constantly striving to make a place for women in the society and in this academic arena
c. there is no mention of any struggles wrt women v/s women on basis of status, ego etc. (there is a mention of power struggle, but its in a different context => which is actually option D)
=> so, why would the female scholars be so careful about what they write and how they analyze, unless there is some kind of bias/prejudice within the academic establishment => and based on the passage this is heavily focussed on gender
=> you can infer it is "predominantly male" (if above doesnt suffice, try looking at the passage in the lens of not "predominantly male", many of the struggles, problems faced by female scholars wont make sense)

Thus eliminated A, its an inference.
Option D => you have a direct reference of it in the last paragraph:
"These questions are political in the sense that the debate over them will inevitably be less an exploration of abstract matters in a spirit of disinterested inquiry than an academic power struggle in which the careers and professional fortunes of many women scholars only now entering the academic profession in substantial numbers-will be at stake"

Leaving you with option E - which itself stands out due to the extreme nature of the option (probably the reason why there may not need be a need to read the paragraph to answer such questions)
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 01 May 2020, 05:06
Can someone help with Q18? I was able to successfully eliminate III, so C, D and E options were eliminated. I was stuck in trying to find evidence for I and II in the passage. Although the gist of the passage was about how women crtics' artistic approach is looked down upon, I didn't find any evidence that they would "bring something UNIQUE" to the table.

For II, the last sentence talks about creating a construct a new theory that is somewhere between completely objective and completely artistic/intuitive. So the women critics are indeed creating a new theory that uses elements from both processes.
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 01 May 2020, 05:20
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Zohair123 wrote:
Can someone help with Q18? I was able to successfully eliminate III, so C, D and E options were eliminated. I was stuck in trying to find evidence for I and II in the passage. Although the gist of the passage was about how women crtics' artistic approach is looked down upon, I didn't find any evidence that they would "bring something UNIQUE" to the table.

For II, the last sentence talks about creating a construct a new theory that is somewhere between completely objective and completely artistic/intuitive. So the women critics are indeed creating a new theory that uses elements from both processes.


II. They must develop. a new theory of the critical process.

As long as the academic establishment continues to regard objective analysis as "masculine" and an intuitive approach as "feminine," the theoretician must steer a delicate philosophical course between the two. If she wishes to construct a theory of feminist criticism, she would be well advised to place it within the framework of a general theory of the critical process that is neither purely objective nor purely intuitive. Her theory is then more likely to be compared and contrasted with other theories of criticism with some degree of dispassionate distance.

be careful when you handle a question in which you have extreme words.

Must and wishes are very distinct

Regards
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 01 May 2020, 09:17
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6/7 correct
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 01 May 2020, 10:21
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Swetabh wrote:
6/7 correct


That's a great score.
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 13 May 2020, 00:47
Carcass wrote:
Zohair123 wrote:
Can someone help with Q18? I was able to successfully eliminate III, so C, D and E options were eliminated. I was stuck in trying to find evidence for I and II in the passage. Although the gist of the passage was about how women crtics' artistic approach is looked down upon, I didn't find any evidence that they would "bring something UNIQUE" to the table.

For II, the last sentence talks about creating a construct a new theory that is somewhere between completely objective and completely artistic/intuitive. So the women critics are indeed creating a new theory that uses elements from both processes.


II. They must develop. a new theory of the critical process.

As long as the academic establishment continues to regard objective analysis as "masculine" and an intuitive approach as "feminine," the theoretician must steer a delicate philosophical course between the two. If she wishes to construct a theory of feminist criticism, she would be well advised to place it within the framework of a general theory of the critical process that is neither purely objective nor purely intuitive. Her theory is then more likely to be compared and contrasted with other theories of criticism with some degree of dispassionate distance.

be careful when you handle a question in which you have extreme words.

Must and wishes are very distinct

Regards

But about I , I also don't see unique anything
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 13 May 2020, 09:04
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Flashinthepan wrote:
Carcass wrote:
Zohair123 wrote:
Can someone help with Q18? I was able to successfully eliminate III, so C, D and E options were eliminated. I was stuck in trying to find evidence for I and II in the passage. Although the gist of the passage was about how women crtics' artistic approach is looked down upon, I didn't find any evidence that they would "bring something UNIQUE" to the table.

For II, the last sentence talks about creating a construct a new theory that is somewhere between completely objective and completely artistic/intuitive. So the women critics are indeed creating a new theory that uses elements from both processes.


II. They must develop. a new theory of the critical process.

As long as the academic establishment continues to regard objective analysis as "masculine" and an intuitive approach as "feminine," the theoretician must steer a delicate philosophical course between the two. If she wishes to construct a theory of feminist criticism, she would be well advised to place it within the framework of a general theory of the critical process that is neither purely objective nor purely intuitive. Her theory is then more likely to be compared and contrasted with other theories of criticism with some degree of dispassionate distance.

be careful when you handle a question in which you have extreme words.

Must and wishes are very distinct

Regards

But about I , I also don't see unique anything



You may wanna read the last paragraph of the passage again. Specifically, the first few lines.


These questions are political in the sense that the debate over them will inevitably be less an exploration of abstract matters in a spirit of disinterested inquiry than an academic power struggle in which the careers and professional fortunes of many women scholars only now entering the academic profession in substantial numbers-will be at stake, and with them the chances for a

distinctive contribution to humanistic understanding, a contribution that might be an important influence against sexism in our society

.



This implies that the author believes that women are capable of bringing some distinctive to the society.
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 28 Jun 2020, 06:37
I am confused with the choices of A and D in the last question, number 23. Can anyone please explain it?
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2020, 11:20
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For ques 23, just take a look at the main idea of political problem mentioned in the para, it says they have academic power struggle(that means someone wants power over the. other). The only option having problem with power is A.
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2020, 05:29
I am confused about question 22. Help please!.
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 01 Aug 2020, 06:51
Why can't choice (C) work for Q22?
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 02 Aug 2020, 01:05
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If she defines feminist criticism as creative and intuitive, privileged as art, then her work becomes vulnerable to the prejudices of stereotypic ideas about the ways in which women think, and will be dismissed by much of the academic establishment. Because of these prejudices


22. Which of the following is most likely to be one of, the "utilitarian political objectives" mentioned by the author ?

(A) To forge a new theory of literary criticism - wrong

(B) To pursue truth in a disinterested manner - wrong

(C) To demonstrate that women are interested in literary criticism that can be viewed either subjectively or objectively - Wrong the can use both of the worlds

(D) To convince the academic establishment to revise the ways in which it assesses women scholars' professional qualities - CORRECT

(E) To dissuade women who are literary critics from taking a subjective approach to literary criticism - Wrong
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Re: Is the literary critic like the poet [#permalink] New post 03 Aug 2020, 06:02
4/7 correct.
Re: Is the literary critic like the poet   [#permalink] 03 Aug 2020, 06:02
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