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In the 1980s, neuroscientists studying the brain processes u

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In the 1980s, neuroscientists studying the brain processes u [#permalink] New post 17 Jan 2017, 09:21
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Question Stats:

75% (02:21) correct 25% (07:37) wrong based on 4 sessions


In the 1980s, neuroscientists studying the brain processes underlying our sense of conscious will compared subjects’ judgments regarding their subjective will to move (W) and actual movement (M) with objective electroencephalographic activity called readiness potential, or RP . As expected, W preceded M: subjects consciously perceived the intention to move as preceding a conscious experience of actually moving. This might seem to suggest an appropriate correspondence between the sequence of subjective experiences and the sequence of the underlying events in the brain. But researchers actually found a surprising temporal relation between subjective experience and objectively measured neural events: in direct contradiction of the classical conception of free will, neural preparation to move (RP) preceded conscious awareness of the intention to move (W) by hundreds of milliseconds.
Based on information contained in the passage, which of the following chains of events would most closely conform to the classical conception of free will?

A) W followed by RP followed by M
B) RP followed by W followed by M
C) M followed by W followed by RP
D) RP followed by M followed by W
E) RP followed by W and M simultaneously 

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
A


In the context in which it appears, “temporal ” most nearly means

A) secular
B) mundane
C) numerical
D) physiological
E) chronological

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
E


The author of the passage mentions the classical conception of free will primarily in order to

A) argue that earlier theories regarding certain brain processes were based on false assumptions.
B) suggest a possible flaw in the reasoning of neuroscientists conducting the study discussed in the passage
C) provide a possible explanation for the unexpected results obtained by neuroscientists
D) cast doubt on neuroscientists’ conclusions regarding the temporal sequence of brain processes.
E) indicate the reason that the results of the neuroscientists’ study were surprising.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
E


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Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 4898
Followers: 74

Kudos [?]: 976 [0], given: 4495

CAT Tests
Re: In the 1980s, neuroscientists studying the brain processes u [#permalink] New post 17 Jan 2017, 09:29
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Explanation


1) The last sentence contradicted the actual sequence RP preceded W. As such, in the old conception is the other way around. A is the answer.

2) Choice E  ​ is therefore correct because “chronological”  means “related to time”.

3)   ​ Choice E is correct; by mentioning the classical (i.e., expected) conception being contradicted, the author gives the reader a reason that the events were  unexpected. 
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Re: In the 1980s, neuroscientists studying the brain processes u   [#permalink] 17 Jan 2017, 09:29
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