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In the 1930’s, Pablum, the first pre-cooked, dried baby food

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In the 1930’s, Pablum, the first pre-cooked, dried baby food [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2017, 14:19
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In the 1930’s, Pablum, the first pre-cooked, dried baby food, was sold in America. Pablum took its name from the Latin word pabulum, which meant “foodstuff,” and was also used in medicine to refer to a passively absorbed source of nutrition. While Pablum contained vitamin D and thus helped to prevent rickets in an era in which child malnutrition was still widespread, ironically, the word pablum—undoubtedly influenced by the negative connotation of the word pabulum as well as the physical reality of a mushy, bland, rehydrated cereal—today means “trite, naïve, or simplistic ideas or writings; intellectual pap.”

Which of the following best describes the irony of the shifting meanings of the word pablum?

(A) A word for a passively absorbed source of nutrition is used for a substance actively fed to babies.
(B) Many babies would have died of malnutrition without Pablum.
(C) A word derived from Latin is still in use in modern English, although the meaning has changed somewhat.
(D) A cereal designed to be nourishing now lends its name to a word for something lacking in substance.
(E) Just as babies are fed bland food, pablum today means “bland writing or ideas.”
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: In the 1930’s, Pablum, the first pre-cooked, dried baby food [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2018, 20:02
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is the ans D?
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Re: In the 1930’s, Pablum, the first pre-cooked, dried baby food [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2018, 10:26
Answer for this please
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Re: In the 1930’s, Pablum, the first pre-cooked, dried baby food [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2018, 15:28
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Added the OA. It is D.

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Re: In the 1930’s, Pablum, the first pre-cooked, dried baby food   [#permalink] 14 Jan 2018, 15:28
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In the 1930’s, Pablum, the first pre-cooked, dried baby food

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