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The attribution of early-nineteenth-century English

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VP
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Joined: 07 Jun 2014
Posts: 1402
GRE 1: 323 Q167 V156
WE: Business Development (Energy and Utilities)
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Kudos [?]: 347 [1] , given: 96

The attribution of early-nineteenth-century English [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2016, 02:31
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The attribution of early-nineteenth-century English fiction is notoriously problematic. Fewer than half of new novels published in Britain between 1800 and 1829 had the author’s true name printed on the title page. Most of these titles have subsequently been attributed, either through the author’s own acknowledgment of a previously anonymous or pseudonymous work, or through bibliographical research. One important tool available to researchers is the list of earlier works “by the author” often found on title pages. But such lists are as likely to create new confusion as they are to solve old problems. Title pages were generally prepared last in the publication process, often without full authorial assent, and in the last-minute rush to press, mistakes were frequently made.


For the following question, consider each of the choices separately and select all that apply.

22. The passage suggests that which of the following factors contributes to the “notoriously problematic” (line 1) nature of authorial attribution in early nineteenth century English fiction?

A The unwillingness of any writers to acknowledge their authorship of works that were originally published anonymously or pseudonymously
B The possibility that the title page of a work may attribute works written by other authors to the author of that work
C The possibility that the author’s name printed on a title page is fictitious

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
B, C

For the following question, consider each of the choices separately and select all that apply.
23. The passage suggests that which of the following is frequently true of the title pages of early-nineteenth-century English novels?

A The title page was prepared for printing in a hurried manner.
B Material on the title page was included without the author’s knowledge or approval.
C Information on the title page was deliberately falsified to make the novel more marketable.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
A, B



Practice Test Questions
Question: 22-23
Page: 444

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Sandy

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VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jun 2014
Posts: 1402
GRE 1: 323 Q167 V156
WE: Business Development (Energy and Utilities)
Followers: 22

Kudos [?]: 347 [0], given: 96

Re: The attribution of early-nineteenth-century English [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2016, 02:37
Expert's post
Explanation

22. Choices B and C are correct.

Choice A is incorrect: the passage mentions that the attribution of early-nineteenth century fiction was sometimes achieved when the author came forward to acknowledge a previously anonymous work (lines 4–5), so Choice A can be eliminated.

Choice B is correct: in lines 5–7, the passage mentions that “one important tool available to researchers is the list of earlier works ‘by the author’ often found on title pages,” but goes on to say that these title pages were prepared hastily and “frequently” contained mistakes (lines 8–10). Since the mistake most likely to “create new confusion” would be the inclusion of works not written by the author, Choice B may be inferred.

Choice C is correct: in lines 2–3, the passage states, “Fewer than half of the new novels published in Britain . . . had the author’s true name printed on the title page.” Line 5 suggests that pseudonyms — fictitious names — were commonly used. Hence, Choice C may be inferred.


23. Choices A and B are correct.

Choice A is correct: the passage mentions that title pages were prepared last and that mistakes often occurred “in the last-minute rush to press”
(line 9). This indicates that title pages were often prepared for printing in a hurried manner; hence, Choice A can be inferred.

Choice B is correct: the passage includes the detail that title pages were often prepared for printing “without full authorial assent” (line 9); hence, Choice B can be inferred.

Choice C is incorrect: nowhere does the passage speculate about commercial motives for falsifying information on title pages. Choice C, therefore, cannot be inferred.
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Sandy

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Re: The attribution of early-nineteenth-century English   [#permalink] 04 Apr 2016, 02:37
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