It is currently 21 Feb 2017, 01:48
My Tests

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

QOTD # 7-8-9-10 This passage is adapted from material publis

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 1111
Followers: 15

Kudos [?]: 129 [0], given: 675

QOTD # 7-8-9-10 This passage is adapted from material publis [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2016, 07:19
Expert's post
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  5% (low)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
This passage is adapted from material published in 2001.

Frederick Douglass was unquestionably the most famous African American of the nineteenth century; indeed, when he died in 1895 he was among the most distinguished public figures in the United States. In his study of Douglass’ career as a major figure in the movement to abolish slavery and as a spokesman for Black rights, Waldo Martin has provoked controversy by contending that Douglass also deserves a prominent place in the intellectual history of the United States because he exemplified so many strands of nineteenth-century thought: romanticism, idealism, individualism, liberal humanism, and an unshakable belief in progress. But this very argument provides ammunition for those who claim that most of Douglass’ ideas, being so representative of their time, are
now obsolete. Douglass’ vision of the future as a melting pot in which all racial and ethnic differences would dissolve into “a composite American nationality” appears from the pluralist perspective of many present-day intellectuals to be not only utopian but even wrongheaded. Yet there is a central aspect of Douglass’ thought that seems not in the least bit dated or irrelevant to current concerns. He has no rival in the history of the nineteenth-century United States as an insistent and effective critic of the doctrine of innate racial inequality. He not only attacked racist ideas in his speeches and writings, but he offered his entire career and all his achievements as living proof that racists were wrong in their belief that one race could be inherently superior to another.

While Martin stresses Douglass’ antiracist egalitarianism, he does not adequately explain how this aspect of Douglass’ thought fits in with his espousal of the liberal Vic-torian attitudes that many present-day intellectuals consider to be naïve and outdated. The fact is that Douglass was attracted to these democratic-capitalist ideals of his time because they could be used to attack slavery and the doctrine of White supremacy. His favorite rhetorical strategy was to expose the hypocrisy of those who, while professing adherence to the ideals of democracy and equality of opportunity, condoned slavery and racial discrimination. It would have been strange indeed if he had not embraced liberal idealism, because it proved its worth for the cause of racial equality during the national crisis that eventually resulted in emancipation and citizenship for African Americans. These points may seem obvious, but had Martin given them more attention, his analysis might have constituted a more convincing rebuttal to those critics who dismiss Douglass’ ideology as a relic of the past. If one accepts the proposition that Douglass’ deepest commitment was to Black equality and that he used the liberal ideals of his time as weapons in the fight for that cause, then it is hard to fault him for seizing the best weapons at hand.
The passage as a whole can best be described as doing which of the following?

A) Explaining Douglass’ emergence as a major figure in the movement to abolish slavery
B) Tracing the origins of Douglass’ thought in nineteenth-century romanticism, idealism, and liberal humanism
C) Analyzing Douglass’ speeches and writings from a modern, pluralist perspective
D) Criticizing Martin for failing to stress the contradiction between Douglass’ principles and the liberal Victorian attitudes of his day
E) Formulating a response to those who consider Douglass’ political philosophy to be archaic and irrelevant

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
E



It can be inferred that the “present-day intellectuals” (line 12) believe that

A) although Douglass used democratic-capitalist ideas to attack slavery and racial inequality, he did not sincerely believe in those ideas
B) the view that Douglass was representative of the intellectual trends of his time is obsolete
C) Douglass’ opposition to the doctrine of innate racial inequality is irrelevant to current concerns
D) Douglass’ commitment to Black equality does not adequately account for his naïve attachment to quaint liberal Victorian political views
E) Douglass’ goal of ultimately doing away with all racial and ethnic differences is neither achievable nor desirable

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
E



According to the passage, Douglass used which of the following as evidence against the doctrine of innate racial inequality?

A) His own life story
B) His vision of a composite American nationality
C) The hypocrisy of self-professed liberal idealists
D ) The inevitability of the emancipation of African Americans
E) The fact that most prominent intellectuals advocated the abolition of slavery

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
A



Each of the following is mentioned in the passage as an element of Douglass’ ideology EXCEPT

A) idealism
B) egalitarianism
C) capitalism
D) pluralism
E) humanism

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
D



Practice Questions
Question: 7,8,9, and 10
Page: 42

_________________

Get the 17 FREE GREPrepclub Tests

Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 1111
Followers: 15

Kudos [?]: 129 [0], given: 675

Re: QOTD # 7-8-9-10 This passage is adapted from material publis [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2016, 07:23
Expert's post
Explanation

7) Choice E is the correct answer. The passage discusses the views and intellectual legacy of Frederick Douglass. The key claim in the first paragraph is that while some of Douglass’ views are no longer widely accepted, “there is a central aspect of Douglass’ thought that seems not the least bit dated or irrelevant to our current concerns” (lines 13-14). The second paragraph critiques a study of Douglass’ career by Waldo Martin and claims that Martin has failed to offer a “convincing rebuttal to those critics who dismiss Douglass’ ideology as a relic of the past” (lines 30-31). This indicates that Choice E is correct.

8) Choice E is the correct answer. “Present-day intellectuals” are mentioned on line 12; the claim there is that these intellectuals consider Douglass’ vision of America as “a melting pot in which all racial and ethnic differences would dissolve” (lines 10-11) as “utopian” and “wrongheaded” (lines 12-13). This points to Choice E as correct.

9) Choice A is the correct answer. One of the claims in the passage is that Frederick Douglass “offered his entire career and all his achievements as living proof that racists were wrong in their belief that one race could be inherently superior to another” (lines 17-18). Thus Choice A is correct.

10) Choice D is the correct answer. The passage claims that Douglass “exemplified … idealism, … liberal humanism” (lines 6-7); it implies that Douglass espoused “antiracist egalitarianism” (line 19) and states that “Douglass was attracted to … democratic-capitalist ideals of his time” (line 22). This rules out Choices A, B, C, and E and leaves Choice D as correct. Indeed, the mention of “Douglass’ vision of the future as a melting pot in which all racial and ethnic differences would dissolve” (lines 10-11) shows that Douglass was not a pluralist, i.e. was not someone who aimed at preserving and celebrating ethnic and cultural differences.
_________________

Get the 17 FREE GREPrepclub Tests

Manager
Manager
Joined: 12 Jan 2016
Posts: 144
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 50 [0], given: 17

Re: QOTD # 7-8-9-10 This passage is adapted from material publis [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2016, 01:28
Can anybody please tell me what should be a perfect time limit within which the above passage should be completed along with answering the questions?.
Please do reply as its very important for me.
Re: QOTD # 7-8-9-10 This passage is adapted from material publis   [#permalink] 02 Oct 2016, 01:28
Display posts from previous: Sort by

QOTD # 7-8-9-10 This passage is adapted from material publis

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GRE Prep Club Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GRE Prep Club Rules| Contact

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GRE® test is a registered trademark of the Educational Testing Service®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by ETS®.