It is currently 20 Oct 2017, 18:43
My Tests

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

QOTD # 1-2 Ragwort was accidentally introduced to New

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 2137
Followers: 30

Kudos [?]: 309 [0], given: 1265

QOTD # 1-2 Ragwort was accidentally introduced to New [#permalink] New post 14 Sep 2016, 02:44
Expert's post
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  5% (low)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
Ragwort was accidentally introduced to New Zealand in the late nineteenth century and, like so many invading foreign species, quickly became a pest. By the 1920s, the weed was rampant. What made matters worse was that its proliferation coincided with sweeping changes in agriculture and a massive shift from sheep farming to dairying. Ragwort contains a battery of toxic and resilient alkaloids: even honey made from its flowers contains the poison in dilute form. Livestock generally avoid grazing where ragwort is growing, but they will do so once it displaces grass and clover in their pasture. Though sheep can eat it for months before showing any signs of illness, if cattle eat it they sicken quickly, and fatality can even result.
The passage suggests that the proliferation of ragwort was particularly ill-timed because it

A) coincided with and exacerbated a decline in agriculture
B) took place in conditions that enabled the ragwort to spread faster than it otherwise would have done
C) led to an increase in the amount of toxic compounds contained in the plants
D) prevented people from producing honey that could be eaten safely
E) had consequences for livestock that were more dramatic than they otherwise would have been

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
E


For the following question, consider each of the choices separately and select all that apply.

The passage implies which of the following about the problems ragwort poses to dairy farmers?

  • Milk produced by cows that eat ragwort causes illness in humans who drink it.
  • Ragwort can supplant the plants normally eaten by cattle.
  • Cattle, unlike sheep, are unable to differentiate between ragwort and healthy grazing.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
B



Practice Questions
Question: 1 and 2
Page: 34

_________________

Get the 17 FREE GREPrepclub Tests

Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 2137
Followers: 30

Kudos [?]: 309 [0], given: 1265

Re: QOTD # 1 Ragwort was accidentally introduced to New Zealand [#permalink] New post 14 Sep 2016, 02:49
Expert's post
Explanation

1) The passage mentions that ragwort’s impact on New Zealand’s agriculture was especially severe because the plant’s proliferation “coincided with sweeping changes in agriculture that saw a massive shift from sheep farming to dairying.” The severity of the impact was increased because cattle, which were displacing sheep, are much more sensitive than sheep to the toxins contained in ragwort.
This points to Choice E as the correct answer choice. Nothing in the passage suggests that the proliferation of ragwort coincided with a decline in agriculture (Choice A), occurred faster than it might have done (Choice B), or made the plants more toxic (Choice C). There is a suggestion that ragwort honey might not be safe for humans, but there is no indication that this made the timing of the proliferation particularly unfortunate.

2) Choice B is correct. The question asks about the problems ragwort poses to dairy farmers.
Choice A is incorrect: The passage does not mention the effect of ragwort consumption on the milk produced by cows.
Choice B is correct: The passage mentions that livestock will eat ragwort “once it displaces grass and clover in their pasture.” Choice C is incorrect: The passage claims that “livestock generally avoid grazing where ragwort is growing,” but does not make a distinction between cattle and sheep.
_________________

Get the 17 FREE GREPrepclub Tests

Intern
Intern
Joined: 19 Sep 2017
Posts: 2
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: QOTD # 1 Ragwort was accidentally introduced to New Zealand [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2017, 11:51
Carcass wrote:
Explanation

1) The passage mentions that ragwort’s impact on New Zealand’s agriculture was especially severe because the plant’s proliferation “coincided with sweeping changes in agriculture that saw a massive shift from sheep farming to dairying.” The severity of the impact was increased because cattle, which were displacing sheep, are much more sensitive than sheep to the toxins contained in ragwort.
This points to Choice E as the correct answer choice. Nothing in the passage suggests that the proliferation of ragwort coincided with a decline in agriculture (Choice A), occurred faster than it might have done (Choice B), or made the plants more toxic (Choice C). There is a suggestion that ragwort honey might not be safe for humans, but there is no indication that this made the timing of the proliferation particularly unfortunate.

2) Choice B is correct. The question asks about the problems ragwort poses to dairy farmers.
Choice A is incorrect: The passage does not mention the effect of ragwort consumption on the milk produced by cows.
Choice B is correct: The passage mentions that livestock will eat ragwort “once it displaces grass and clover in their pasture.” Choice C is incorrect: The passage claims that “livestock generally avoid grazing where ragwort is growing,” but does not make a distinction between cattle and sheep.




I'm confused about why Choice A is incorrect.. The question is asking the "implication" of the passage, and can't we imply the choice A?
If the farmers moved to dairying (such as honey in passage for example), then also we can imply that milk produced by cows can be harmful..
as the same reason as honey in the passage. Can you please explain?
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 2137
Followers: 30

Kudos [?]: 309 [0], given: 1265

Re: QOTD # 1-2 Ragwort was accidentally introduced to New [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2017, 22:23
Expert's post
Are pointing out the first or second one? Please tell me.

regards
_________________

Get the 17 FREE GREPrepclub Tests

Intern
Intern
Joined: 19 Sep 2017
Posts: 2
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: QOTD # 1-2 Ragwort was accidentally introduced to New [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2017, 13:20
Carcass wrote:
Are pointing out the first or second one? Please tell me.

regards



Oops sorry! The second question please!
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 2137
Followers: 30

Kudos [?]: 309 [0], given: 1265

Re: QOTD # 1-2 Ragwort was accidentally introduced to New [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2017, 22:41
Expert's post
sarahkim0530 wrote:
Carcass wrote:
Are pointing out the first or second one? Please tell me.

regards



Oops sorry! The second question please!


In the second question, A is incorrect for one simple reason: there is no mention of illness in humans who drink milk from the cows in the entire passage. So you can NOT imply that.
_________________

Get the 17 FREE GREPrepclub Tests

Re: QOTD # 1-2 Ragwort was accidentally introduced to New   [#permalink] 20 Sep 2017, 22:41
Display posts from previous: Sort by

QOTD # 1-2 Ragwort was accidentally introduced to New

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GRE Prep Club Forum Home| About| Terms of Use| GRE Prep Club Rules| Contact

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group

Kindly note that the GRE® test is a registered trademark of the Educational Testing Service®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by ETS®.