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Among the more interesting elements of etymology is the att

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Among the more interesting elements of etymology is the att [#permalink] New post 26 May 2017, 00:42
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Among the more interesting elements of etymology is the attempt to derive the meaning of seemingly nonsensical expressions. Take, for instance, the increasingly archaic rural phrase “to buy a pig in a poke.” For centuries, the expression has been used to signify the purchase of an item without full knowledge of its condition. It relates to the common Renaissance practice of securing suckling pigs for transport to market in a poke, or drawstring bag. Unscrupulous sellers would sometimes attempt to dupe purchasers by replacing the suckling pig with a cat, considered worthless at market. An unsuspecting or naïve buyer might fail to confirm the bag’s contents; a more urbane buyer, though, would be sure to check and—should the seller be dishonest—“let the cat out of the bag.”
Consider each of the choices separately and select all that apply.


Which of the following phrases from the passage would help the reader infer the meaning of the word urbane as used in context?

❑ “increasingly archaic rural phrase”

❑ “without full knowledge”

❑ “unsuspecting or naïve buyer”

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
C


Select the sentence in which the author provides a definition for an antiquated term that may be unfamiliar to the reader.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
It relates to the common Renaissance practice of securing suckling pigs for transport to market in a poke, or drawstring bag.


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Among the more interesting elements of etymology is the att   [#permalink] 26 May 2017, 00:42
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